Photo by Karen D. Miller

Inspiration Photo #20

camping inspiration 2

What:   Looking up at a maple tree at night.

Why did this catch my eye:   I love this kind of photo.  There is so much scope there:  the shapes, the variations in colours, the patterns.  There is something about the lighting at night that creates all sorts of great nuances that get the creative juices going.

Karen

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I committed to posting 40 inspiration photos on the blog in 2014. The purpose of this exercise is to get me out of my comfort-zone: finding inspiration in my everyday surroundings. This series will continue throughout the year.

photo by Karen D. Miller

Inspiration Photo #19

camping inspiration 3

What:   A campfire taken through a hole in the grating around the fire pit.

Why did this catch my eye:   I know this is a bit of a strange one…but if you really look closely….there are magnificent shapes and forms in there.  And the colours- ranging from red to orange to yellow.  So bold and warm.  A fantastic study for abstract design.

Karen

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I committed to posting 40 inspiration photos on the blog in 2014. The purpose of this exercise is to get me out of my comfort-zone: finding inspiration in my everyday surroundings. This series will continue throughout the year.

Inspiration Photos #18: TEXTURE

texture 1

texture 5

texture 100

texturey

textured

texture 2

What: Photos from my maritime vacation that I felt fell under the design element of “texture”

Why did this catch my eye:   I love incorporating texture into my work.  To me, it is one of the main advantages to fibre art.  The audience doesn’t have to imagine that there is texture, they can actually see and feel the texture.  For that reason my eye is always seeking out texture in my surroundings and trying to figure out what material will help me to translate it to my art.

Karen

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I committed to posting 40 inspiration photos on the blog in 2014. The purpose of this exercise is to get me out of my comfort-zone: finding inspiration in my everyday surroundings. This series will continue throughout the year.

Photo of Simone Vojvodin

Countdown to “Colours Caught in Fibre”: Meet Simone Vojvodin

 

 

It is not long until our group exhibit “Colours Caught in Fibre:  Rug-Hooking Made Modern” opens on October 4th at the Niagara Pumphouse Arts Centre in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

I gave each of the artists in our show the same list of questions and each week leading up to the exhibit I will profile one of them so that you can get to know them better and see their particular style of art.  This week, meet Simone Vojvodin.  Simone’s specialty is hooking animals and her love for them shines through in every piece as she takes her work to a whole new level of realism.  Her work has been featured in Rug Hooking Magazine’s Celebration of Hand-Hooked Rugs twice, and last year her piece entitled “My True Love” was awarded third place in Rug Hooking Magazine’s Reader’s Choice Awards.  Simone has also taught numerous workshops and private classes, has her Oxford Teacher Certification for punch-needle and runs her own online rug-hooking business called Red Maple Ruggery.

 

1.Simone, how long have you been hooking?

I started hooking in 2010.

2.How did you get started hooking?

I found a book in the library featuring some beautiful hooked rugs- after pouring over the pages I really wanted to give it a try! After some research I decided that punch needle was the technique I wanted to use to hook. My husband made us frames, bought punch hooks, a book by Amy Oxford, and we started creating rugs…. I was instantly ‘hooked’!

3. Did you have a teacher or are you self-taught?

I’m self taught.

4. What was the first piece you hooked?

I hooked a little chair pad that has a little star on it and words from children’s rhyme. After that I made the jump to hooking a portrait rug of our old dog ‘Ryley’.

5. How do you think your style has evolved since your first piece?

My first pieces were made following all the ‘rules’ and were very ‘safe’. I’ve grown in my confidence since those early days and enjoy pushing the boundaries and really exploring my subjects and challenging myself.

Hooked rug by Simone Vojvodin

“My First Love” by Simone Vojvodin

6. What is your proudest rug-hooking accomplishment?

I have two. First is receiving a ‘Viewers Choice’ award from Celebrations. The second is receiving my Oxford Teacher Certification in2011, and teaching punch needle rug hooking.

7. Where do you find inspiration for your work?

Inspiration comes from nature and from my dreams. I frequently start awake in the middle of the night with an idea for rug! I keep a sketch book by the bed so I can capture these ideas before they are lost into the night. Luckily my husband is a very patient man and is used to being jolted awake by me when I have an idea!

8. What is your favourite subject matter for your work?

Hands down, animals are my favourite subject matter.

9. What kind of hooking frame and hook do you use?

I use Oxford punch needles and either an ‘Anderson’ style floor frame or a gripper frame.

10. What will people see of your work at the Colours Caught in Fibre exhibit in Niagara-on-the-Lake?

Some of my more familiar pieces including my Celebrations Rug “My first Love” will be in Niagara. I’ve been experimenting with some exciting new designs and techniques and a few of these new pieces will be exhibited for the first time.

Hooked rug by Simone Vojvodin

“Kayla” by Simone Vojvodin

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I hope you have enjoyed learning a bit more about Simone and her work. If you are interested in her work and would like to contact her she can be reached at simone@redmapleruggery.ca.

 

Karen

Photo by Karen D. Miller

Inspiration photo #17

camping inspiration

What:   Looking up at a maple tree while camping, late at night with just the light from the campfire.  The camera did this really cool blurry green thing and I love it.

Why did this catch my eye:   There is no way to tell that this is leaves, but the overall shape is fantastic.  The blurring makes it very abstract.  And the vibrant green is reminiscent of the Northern Lights.

Karen

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I committed to posting 40 inspiration photos on the blog in 2014. The purpose of this exercise is to get me out of my comfort-zone: finding inspiration in my everyday surroundings. This series will continue throughout the year.

Inspiration Photos #16: SHAPE

shape 2

shapes

shapey

What: Photos from my maritime vacation that I felt fell under the design element of “shape”

Why did this catch my eye: Shapes are everywhere in nature.  And not just the usual circles, squares, rectangles, etc.  Here are a few that I found in the maritimes- from flower shaped jellyfish to funky knots in wooden logs on the beach, to strange bulbous shapes made by a small mudslide on the side of a cliff.  I challenge you to look around you today and find unusual shapes in ordinary places.

Karen

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I committed to posting 40 inspiration photos on the blog in 2014. The purpose of this exercise is to get me out of my comfort-zone: finding inspiration in my everyday surroundings. This series will continue throughout the year.

Photo by Karen D. Miller

Camping Weekend

Photo by Karen D. Miller

This past long weekend we went camping at Murphy’s Point Provincial Park which is about halfway between Lombardy and Perth, Ontario.  (And Lombardy just happens to be where my favourite go-to place for antique window frames is located so I just may have dragged along a couple of new windows to the campsite….).  I was really, really hoping that it would go better than our last camping back in July.  And it was much, much better!  Our campsite was great- very secluded and spacious.  The bugs were no worse than we would find in our own backyard.  The weather was terrific except for one really big thunderstorm in the middle of Saturday night but it didn’t really bother us overly much.

The park itself was great too.  On the Sunday they had an open house of the Silver Queen Mica Mine which was an actual active mica mine back in the early 1900’s.  All along the trail they had costumed interpreters and the kids each had a little activity book to fill in.

The mine itself was like stepping into another world- when you looked back at the entrance you had come down through it was covered in bright green foliage and there was a slight mist in the air which gave it all a very otherworldly effect.

Photo by Karen D. Miller

Photo by Karen D. Miller

Photo by Karen D. Miller

Photo by Karen D. Miller

The park also had a little beach by the lake and so we spent the afternoon there and had a lot of fun.

It was all very bittersweet though as the camping season is now over and it is back to school and back to routine.  This Fall is unbelievably busy for me- in a good way but I still have I believe six major deadlines between now and the end of November.  So it was nice to get away, relax and regroup for the busy months ahead!

Karen

photo by Gunda Gamble

Countdown to “Colours Caught in Fibre”: Meet Gunda Gamble

 

 

 

The countdown to our group exhibit continues.   “Colours Caught in Fibre:  Rug-Hooking Made Modern” opens on October 4th at the Niagara Pumphouse Arts Centre in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario.

I gave each of the artists in our show the same list of questions and each week leading up to the exhibit I will profile one of them so that you can get to know them better and see their particular style of art.  This week, meet Gunda Gamble.  Her work has a definite signature look with a focus on earth tones and abstractions of both nature and architecture.  Gunda has been in Rug Hooking Magazine’s Celebration of Hand-Hooked Rugs twice now and has won various other awards for her work.  You can find her work in rug-hooking books and magazines and she has recently started her own business called ‘Crowsfoot Studio’ which makes wooden products for rug-hookers, including frame stands and cutter stands.

 

1. Gunda, how long have you been hooking?

I started hooking in November, 2004.

2. How did you get started hooking?

I had just moved to a new area and I joined a Wednesday afternoon group where everyone did their own preferred crafts. I was knitting and crocheting at that time. Many of the women in that group were rug hooking.

3. Did you have a teacher or are you self-taught?

Because of my Wednesday group I found out about a 4 day Beginner’s class offered by the OHCG in Ancaster, Ontario. My teacher was Iris Simpson. Amongst many things, she taught us how to put a pattern on backing, how to hook, and how to dye wool

 

Hooked rug by Gunda Gamble

“Chaos” by Gunda Gamble

 

4. What was the first piece you hooked?

The first piece was ‘My Fencepost’ which ended up being awarded the Beginner Award at the OHCG Annual in 2006. It was 3’ x 5’ in a #3 cut and I dyed my own wool. I didn’t know I should be intimated by such a big first project.

5. How do you think your style has evolved since your first piece?

I often use materials other than fabric wool, now. I am more aware on the use of colours. I took some painting classes to help me with this process.

6. What is your proudest rug-hooking accomplishment?

I am very proud of both my ‘Long Distance’ and ‘In the Woods Abstract’. They are so different in their styles and I put a lot of myself into each one. The ‘Long Distance’ received the Rowan Award at the OHCG annual in 2011, in London, Ontario and I was accepted as a Original Design Finalist for my ‘In The Woods Abstract’  in the  Celebration XXIII publication, in 2013.

7. Where do you find inspiration for your work?

Nature and architecture. I like the interplay of curvy lines and sharp edges.
8. What is your favourite subject matter for your work?

Anything that I can design with a freeform style using only a few starting lines.

9. What kind of hooking frame and hook do you use?

I like using the Snapdragon frame, but I use my own Crowsfoot Studio Pedestal stand for the support.

10. What will people see of your work at the Colours Caught in Fibre exhibit at Niagara-on-the-Lake?

Stylized natural forms ranging from pure abstract to geometric.

 

 

Hooked rug by Gunda Gamble

“Swells” by Gunda Gamble, 2014

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I hope you have enjoyed learning a bit more about Gunda and her work.  If you are interested in her work or would like to know more about her Crowsfoot Studio products for rug-hookers, she can be reached at gunda.gamble@gmail.com.

 

Karen